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Camissa Museum - Diverse Roots Exhibition

Camissa Museum - Diverse Roots Exhibition

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The Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town, South Africa, is a popular heritage site for visits by schoolchildren and teachers but it currently has no exhibitions that speak to the culture and history of local black communities.

Camissa Museum will be a place of memory and culture dedicated to restorative memory, focused on uncovering the hidden Camissa African history and heritage and in doing so, it will offer descendant communities a means to understand themselves for healing, empowerment and restoration of human dignity after suffering centuries of colonialism, genocide, and ethnocide, slavery, de-Africanisation, and Apartheid.

The museum explores the cultural-ancestral history and heritage of all who share a heritage that goes back to a combination of local Cape indigenous African communities and of African, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Chinese ancestors brought to the Cape as enslaved peoples.

This component of the project is the core of the museum – The Exhibition Boards and the origination of text and images. The funds are to be used specifically for this element of the museum. As one enters the museum there is an introductory video documentary (already funded), giving way to a three-dimensional artistic illuminated representation of the Camissa Story (already funded); and then there are three parts to the exhibition. It is for these three parts consisting of exhibition board displays of text and image for which the funds raised here will be used.


PART 1: Includes asking the question as to who do you think you are? We then look at how Apartheid Race Classification and social engineering classification labeled people and defined people. The exhibition boards go to look at the earliest beginnings of the people of South Africa 2K – 3 K years ago and shows how from our Foundation Peoples many ethnicities emerged and all have ties that bind us.

With the arrival of enslaved Africans and Asian, our diversity of roots expanded exponentially. The exhibition goes on to explain the meaning of Camissa and then introduces the seven broad tributaries of Camissa Roots and the 195 roots of origin within these seven broad tributaries. This requires R100 000.

 

PART 2: Unpacks each of the Seven Tributaries, one panel at a time, linked to 6 personalities of the times and localities who illustrate the diversity of that tributary. For instance - TRIBUTARY 1 – Indigenous Africans of the Cape – would show 42 roots of origin and present 6 personalities associated with this tributary. The other tributaries are - African-Asian Enslaved Peoples; the Free-Blacks of the Cape; The non-Conformist Europeans of the Cape; the Rebels & Drosters of the Cape; Exiles, Refugees and Convicted banished to the Cape; Apprentices, Sailors, Indentures and other Migrants of color. This is the most complex of the three parts and would cost R170 000.

PART 3: Presents a guide to building a genealogical family tree and how to go about having a dna test and an introduction to howe this can assist in one’s exploration of roots. Part three also pays tribute to the great men and women in Camissa African communities upon whose shoulders we stand. The exhibition concludes with a tribute to the two late leaders from within Camissa Communities who laid the foundation for establishing this type of Museum. This will cost R80 000.

This project within the Camissa Museum involves research, and compilation of a storyboard, design which brings text and images together creatively and then having these transformed into exhibition boards, together with illumination and installation into the museum space provided.

This will be achieved with an additional R350 000 to match a grant of €20 000 awarded to the project by the Dutch Consulate in Cape Town.

 

Social Media: Website : www.camissamuseum.co.za

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Camissa-Museum-The-Peopling-of-the-Cape-2313097358908326 

 

 

 

Donations

  • Sep 16, 2021 - R 2 000.00
  • "

    Keep up the good work ! We need this.

    " - Colleen

  • Aug 02, 2021 - USD $ 274.76
  • "Sending solidarity from one of the Camissa African Diaspora in the UK" - Sophie Talbot

  • Apr 05, 2021 - USD $ 117.00
  • "Brilliant initiative!" - Rafael Verbuyst

  • Mar 20, 2021 - R 2 000.00
  • "I appreciate that you are including important but often hidden or excluded parts9f our South African heritage. " - Tanja Meyburgh

  • Mar 17, 2021 - R 1 000.00
  • "

    I am proud to support this important project which seeks to establish an accurate and inclusive history of South Africa

    " - Stephane Delport

  • Mar 16, 2021 - R 100.00
  • "Great initiative!" - Adrian

  • Mar 12, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "I believe we will grow" - Jacqui Sinclair

  • Feb 23, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "

    Baie belangrike museum vir ons nageslag om ons diversiteit ten toon te stel.

    " - Godfrey Mottie

  • Feb 20, 2021 - R 200.00
  • "Proud to chip in. " - Melanie Steyn

  • Feb 16, 2021 - R 100.00
  • "

    This is an important project of healing and dignity.

    " - Renee

  • Feb 16, 2021 - R 100.00
  • "

    A worthy project that I support 100 %.

    " - Anastacia Isaacs

  • Feb 16, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "

    I fully support this cause, we need this for future generations to be reminded of heritage.

    " - Trevor Jantjes

  • Feb 16, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "

    It is important for our people and country.

    " - Nadia-Ayasha Masonon

  • Feb 15, 2021 - R 200.00
  • "Thank you for this important work " - Anonymous

  • Feb 14, 2021 - USD $ 122.88
  • "Aweh ma se kinnes" - Richard Martin

  • Feb 14, 2021 - USD $ 68.99
  • "Much needed." - Anne-Marie Manners

  • Feb 14, 2021 - R 100.00
  • "Such a worthwhile cause. " - Zak Davis

  • Feb 13, 2021 - USD $ 13.65
  • "This is an important project and deserves all the help it can get" - David Kenvyn

  • Feb 11, 2021 - USD $ 680.14
  • "The more I know my ancestors, the more I know myself." - Athol Williams

  • Feb 10, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "A fantastic project that needs all of our support!" - Shenaaz McKenzie

  • Feb 10, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "I believe in this project. Os is! We are!" - Tariq Mellet

  • Feb 10, 2021 - USD $ 67.64
  • "Support this important project" - Jared

  • Feb 08, 2021 - R 500.00
  • "What a fantastic project" - Jurgen Boyd

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Statistics

Donations to date

R 28 905.58

Fundraising target

R 350 000.00
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Camissa Museum NPC

Camissa Museum NPC Logo

The Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town, South Africa, is a popular heritage site for visits by schoolchildren and teachers and but it currently has no exhibitions that speak to culture and history of local black communities.

Camissa Museum will be a place of memory and culture dedicated to restorative memory, focused on uncovering the hidden Camissa African (aka ‘Coloured’) history and heritage and in doing so, it will offer descendant communities a means to understand themselves for healing, empowerment and restoration of human dignity after suffering centuries of colonialism, genocide and ethnocide, slavery, de-Africanisation and Apartheid.

The museum explores the cultural-ancestral history and heritage of all who share a heritage that goes back to a combination of local Cape indigenous African communities and of African, South Asian, Southeast Asian and Chinese ancestors brought to the Cape as enslaved peoples. The story of these diverse peoples who built the City of Cape Town and the rural towns and farmlands across the Western, Northern and Eastern Capes is told in an exhibition uncovering seven broad cultural-ancestral tributaries and over 195 roots of origin within this framework. The overall emphasis is a heritage of rising above adversity which is told through personalities representative of each of these tributaries. The museum also helps people today to understand how social history combined with genealogy and DNA testing can open up understanding at a personal level of one’s ancestral lineage and cultures.

The mission of the Camissa Museum is to establish, constantly improve and maintain exhibitions, interactive media and educational programmes that highlight heritage. It unpacks of local indigenous African roots and the roots of African, South Asian, Southeast Asian and Chinese who were enslaved people brought to the Cape by the Dutch and British over a 188-year period, between 1652 – 1838.

As a result of the negative legacy of subjugation and enslavement our communities, today wrestle with gangsterism, substance abuse and high levels of violence, aggravated by high levels of unemployment, marginalization, identity-loss and ghettoization. The constructed and imposed ‘Coloured’ identity label is challenged by the museum’s elaboration on and celebration of Camissa African cultural-ancestral heritage, and Khoe and San cultural-ancestral heritage. In this context racism, Afrophobia and xenophobia is also challenged and an appreciation is promoted of Cape communities linkages to all societies along the old global slave routes along with the African and Asian coastline communities

By means of restorative memory, our communities and youth, in particular, are better able to contribute to building social cohesion and unity, as well as becoming innovators and contributing to the social and economic advancement of South Africa. We believe too that in coming to an understanding of their amazing multifaceted ancestral lineage, young people will become culturally creative and will begin to tell their ancestral story through all sorts of artistic media, from writing, film, theatre and dance, to artwork and craftwork. This will enhance communities and build active citizenship.

The museum will also expose youth to the great role-model achievers in our communities in the 20th and 21st century in the sciences, arts, arena of faith, sport, and public representation.

The Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town, South Africa, is a popular heritage site for visits by schoolchildren and teachers and but it currently has no exhibitions that speak to the culture and history of local black communities.