Renowned Cheetah conservation centre crowdfunds for community support

Renowned Cheetah conservation centre crowdfunds for community support 

The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre is a captive breeding facility for South African cheetahs and other animals that is situated in the foothills of the Magaliesberg mountain range in the North West Province of South Africa.

The centre prides itself on its contribution to the conservation and survival of the cheetah species through meticulous breeding (ensuring genetic diversity) and the ability to release captive born cheetahs as and when suitable space becomes available. 

The facility has also played an important role in the academic arena, thus far 80 research publications have been written and undertaken through the organisation.

Veterinary support

The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre currently has over 80 Cheetah’s in their care who constantly need vaccinations and health checks.

As a non-profit organisation that receives no government funding, the centre relies heavily on sponsorship, donations and income generated from tours and the adoption programme, to subsidise their various conservation projects.

With the implementation of the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the organisation has been deeply affected financially as they have been unable to fundraise and operate at full capacity.

To secure funds to cover their outstanding vet bills that have accumulated to over R300 000 over the last 3 years, the organisation has launched a crowdfunding campaign on BackaBuddy to appeal to animal lovers for support.

With generous support, almost R100 000 has been raised towards their fundraising target with contributions from 45 donors from across the globe, to settle their account at the Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic.

Kya and Roxanne are two of the Cheetahs at the centre that have contributed to the vet bill after suffering health setbacks.
  • Kya, is an 8-year-old, female Cheetah who at the end of 2017 injured her left hind leg and fractured her Calcaneus which resulted in her Achilles Tendon becoming very loose.  At the clinic, X-rays were taken and Kya had to undergo surgery to insert screws and pins in her legs.  Unfortunately the skin did not grow over and close her open wound, so a second surgery was needed, as well as vet care for nearly 6 months. Kya is still on the road to recovery.
  • Roxanne, is a 2-year-old Female Cheetah, who was only 7 months old when she climbed a tree and jumped out, putting all her weight onto her right front leg resulting in a Distel Humerus fracture. She was rushed to the veterinary Clinic, for complicated 3 hour surgery that thankfully repaired her fracture. As her elbow had to be fused, she is unable to bend it, but she has made a full recovery from her ordeal.
Make a donation to support The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre
https://www.backabuddy.co.za/veterinary-animal-care-account
Donate directly
Donate via Snapscan

Connect with The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre

Established in 1971 by Ann and originally known as the De Wildt Cheetah Research Centre, the name was changed in 2010, to the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre as a tribute to the woman who has devoted her life to the survival of cheetahs and other rare and endangered species.

Two hour guided tours are offered daily, and on certain mornings guests have the option to book a cheetah run and guided tour package. The cheetah run offers an opportunity to witness a breathtaking high speed cheetah chase. Tours are led by a knowledgeable guide and visitors to the Centre will see a variety of animals including cheetah, King Cheetah, African wild dog, caracal and vultures amongst others. 

Contact The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre.

, ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply